Martijn Verschoor
oorzaak wekenlange moeheid verklaard
04-08-2017 00:00:00

Al wekenlang klaagde Martijn over moeheid tijdens het trainen en tijdens de koers in Polen.

Weer in de wei in de Ronde van Polen
03-08-2017 00:00:00

Dat valt niet mee in de Ronde van Polen. Na twee maanden geen koersdagen een World 

afzien en einde trainingskamp in Italie
20-07-2017 00:00:00

Zo. dat was goed afzien in Italie tijdens het trainingskamp in de bergen. Martijn is

Team Type 1
Team Type 1 began in 2005 with the belief that anything is possible. But many of the 24 million Americans living with diabetes have been told the opposite their entire lives. Each member of Team Type 1 strives to instill hope and inspiration for people around the world affected by diabetes. We believe that anyone with diabetes can achieve their dreams.

We strive to instill hope and inspiration for people around the world affected by diabetes. With appropriate diet, exercise, treatment and technology, we believe anyone with diabetes can achieve their dreams.

On April 21, 2003, Phil Southerland met Joe Eldridge at a college bike race. Phil, who was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at seven months old, was meticulous about controlling his blood sugar. Joe, who was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at age 10, had put his diabetes in the back of his mind, as do many who have diabetes. Both Joe and Phil noticed they were each taking insulin before the start and realized they had something important in common beyond bike racing. They were racing as riders with Type 1 diabetes.

After the race, Joe and Phil's friendship grew. And so did the competition, on and off the bike. Phil was getting frustrated with Joe's lackluster approach to diabetes. So he proposed a bet where the person with the higher blood sugar paid for dinner. For three months, every time they ate out together, Joe ended up taking the bill.

But eventually, as Joe began to learn how to play the diabetes "game," he was able to manage his blood sugar and get it under control. One night at dinner, Joe won the bet and made Phil pay for the dinner. For Joe, winning the bet that night was more than not having to pay for dinner. It was a signal to him that anyone can be a competitive athlete when they manage their diabetes successfully. This insight was a life saver for Joe. And over the next 12 months, Joe lowered his A1C below 7 for the first time in years.

Impressed by Joe's transformation, Phil began to think of how he could make the most of Joe's story, and their friendship, to inspire others with diabetes to do the same. He had a vision to unite everyone with diabetes and to inspire them to take control of their diabetes. On a 300-mile bike ride from Athens, Georgia to Tallahassee, Florida, Phil called Joe with the idea. Over the next 24 hours, the pair brainstormed on their own and over the phone with Joe finally giving a name to their dream: Team Type 1.

Turning a dream into a reality takes hard work, good friends and a bit of luck; fortunately for Joe and Phil, they had all three.

In a chance Tuesday meeting on February 22, 2005, Phil met Daniel Hopkins who asked Phil what he would do with $400 to get Team Type 1 off of the ground. Phil said he would buy t-shirts and business cards to raise money and spread awareness about diabetes. Hopkins gave Phil four $100 bills and wished him well. Phil immediately went to the bank and opened an account under the name "Team Type 1." It was 3:30 pm. By 4:15 pm Phil placed an order for 1,000 business cards and 100 t-shirts at LS Design in Athens. Two weeks later, the package of shirts and cards arrived and the selling began. If you could breathe, Phil sold you a shirt.

At the same time, Joe encouraged Phil to participate in an upcoming JDRF Ride To Cure. The pair sold their t-shirts so they could afford to go. On the ride Joe and Phil shared their story and their dream with the other riders. (And also sold more t-shirts.) After the 100-mile ride, someone at the post-ride dinner suggested that Phil and Joe "do something big," like riding across America. Phil and Joe looked at each other like that was crazy. Then, like reading the other one's mind, they both said at the same time: "Let's do Race Across America! And do it with a team of riders with Type 1 diabetes!" The day was May 19, 2005, and the goal was set to race the following year.

Since Team Type 1's first participation in the Race Across America in 2005, the team has won the race four times and currently holds the Race Across America record for the fastest trans-continental crossing in just 5 days, 9 hours and 5 minutes.

Team Type 1: Mission and Goals

We strive to instill hope and inspiration for people around the world affected by diabetes. With appropriate diet, exercise, treatment and technology, we believe anyone with diabetes can achieve their dreams.

Team Type 1's method to improve the lives of those impacted by diabetes is demonstrated on two fronts, athletics and diabetes community outreach.

Team Type 1 is active every day of the year in diabetes related events to provide hope and inspiration to those living with diabetes and to their families. Team Type 1 participated in over 700 diabetes related events in 2010 alone. These events include appearances and presentations at all diabetes conferences, community events, presentations to medical professionals in the diabetes field and delivery of life-saving diabetes supplies and medication to those in need. The team's outreach extends well beyond the United States. This year over 400 children of Rwanda will receive the necessary supplies and medication to allow them the ability to manage their diabetes and live a longer and healthier life.

Team Type 1's worldwide mission to inspire and change perceptions of what is possible with diabetes all began with a single cycling event in 2005. Eight cyclists, all living with type 1 diabetes entered the Race Across America in 2005 with the mission to show that anything is possible, even while living everyday with type 1 diabetes. Team Type 1 was given little attention in the 2005 Race Across America. The diabetes and cycling community believed that competing in a 3,000 mile, non-stop cycling race wasn't possible. Not only was it possible it was winnable. Since Team Type 1's first participation in the Race Across America, the team has won the race four times and still holds the Race Across America record for the fastest trans-continental crossing in just 5 days, 9 hours and 5 minutes, set in 2009.

Team Type 1 has since expanded to include a Professional Men's and Women's team, a Development Team, a Triathlon Team, an Elite team, a Running Team and Team Type 2. All of the current programs consist of athletes living everyday with diabetes and strive to provide hope and inspiration to all people affected by diabetes.

The programs within Team Type 1 compete in many high profiles events worldwide from the Race Across America to the major tours of professional cycling. In 2011 the Professional Men's Team will continue with the mission of earning a coveted position in the 2012 Tour de France. The newly introduced Team Type 1 Running Team will continue the teams' trans-continental history with a RUN Across America. The Triathlon Team, Development Team, Elite Team and Team Type 2 will also continue to compete on the largest stages of domestic racing to raise awareness, change perceptions and inspire the worldwide diabetes community to properly manage diabetes and live a healthier life with type 1 or type 2 diabetes.

Team Type 1: Meet Phil Southerland, Founder

Phil Southerland was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes when he was only seven months old. Doctors told his mother that he would probably lose his eyesight by the age of 20. Contrary to the doctors' predictions, Phil was racing as a professional cyclist in his 20's with no side effects of diabetes, and changing the way the world views type 1 diabetes.Phil began competitive racing in 1994, at the age of 13. He met Joe Eldridge, a fellow cyclist and competitor in college, and the two founded Team Type 1 in 2004. They wanted to prove to the world that people with Type 1 diabetes were capable of competing in athletics just as well as "normal" people. In 2006, Team Type 1 competed in the highly competitive and demanding Race Across America (RAAM), winning the 8-person division title. Team Type 1 won the 3,000 mile coast to coast race three additional times and currently holds the Race Across America record at 5 days, 9 hours and 5 minutes.

In 2008, Phil expanded Team Type 1 to over 100 competitive athletes with diabetes who race across the globe to instill hope and inspiration to those with and affected by diabetes.

Team Type 1 is an empowering example for over 24 million Americans that people living with diabetes can not only survive, but thrive. The team now consists of an elite cycling team, a women's cycling team, a triathlon team, a running team, a Team Type 2 and a UCI Continental Cycling Team. The programs of Team Type 1 race and advocate in every continent to spread the inspirational message of hope and encourage proper diabetes management.

The success story will continue on as the team hopes to earn a coveted spot in the Tour de France in coming years and thereby demonstrate that with proper diabetes management, utilizing the technological advances in diabetes and hard work, all things are possible.

Phil and Team Type 1 will continue to spread the inspirational message across the world in 2011 as the Professional Team races in the most prestigious cycling tours in Europe with the ultimate goal of earning a coveted spot in the Tour de France.

Phil currently resides in Atlanta, Georgia, where Team Type 1 is headquartered.